Start Here

Here’s the “quick-start guide” to One-Minute Astronomer.  From here, you can navigate the entire site, from highlights of the sky this month to the hundreds of more detailed articles in our archives.

 If you simply want to know what’s up in the sky this month, click here.  This page is updated on the first day of each month.  It’s useful to observers in the northern and southern hemispheres.

 If you’re just getting started as a stargazer, start with (and bookmark) this free guide to the basics of finding your way around the night sky, understanding what you see in the heavens, and choosing binoculars, telescopes, and other equipment.

If you need star maps showing you what stars, planets, and constellations are visible this month, click here.  You’ll a map for your location showing you what you’ll see in the sky while facing north, east, south, west, and overhead.  This map is updated in real time, and it shows the sky as it currently appears.  You can also adjust the map for other times and locations.

One-Minute Astronomer also offers courses through its own “Stargazer University”.   If you’re just starting out, try the “Introduction to Stargazing” course.  It helps you find your way around the night sky, shows you what you can expect to see as a stargazer, and guides you through choosing and using binoculars and telescopes.  And best of all… it’s free!

You might also take a look at our most popular series of articles… the “Bucket List for Backyard Stargazers”.  It takes you to ten sights every stargazer should see in their lifetimes.  Most require nothing more than a pair of binoculars or small telescope to see.  And some just require you to look up.  You can see the list for yourself right here…

And, when you have a little time, dip into the Archives.  You’ll find short articles to help you find what to see in the sky, understand a little of the science of astronomy, and help you better enjoy your interest in stargazing.  If you’re in a hurry, you can get a Kindle e-book of the best articles of the first four years of One-Minute Astronomer.  Click here to learn more…

• For other frequently-asked questions, click here…